Hapshash and the Coloured Coat  

From The Art and Popular Culture Encyclopedia

Jump to: navigation, search

Related e

Google
Wikipedia
Wiktionary
Wiki Commons
Wikiquote
Wikisource
YouTube
Shop


Featured:
Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
Enlarge
Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

Hapshash and the Coloured Coat were a British graphics team consisting of Michael English and Nigel Waymouth in the 1960s, producing psychedelic posters.

They designed usually brightly coloured images with a strong art nouveau influence from Alfons Mucha of swirling lines and curving shapes. Posters were used to promote appearances by major bands of the time such as the Pink Floyd and The Incredible String Band, as well as singers such as Julie Felix, mainly for the underground UFO Club.

English and Waymouth met in late 1966. Waymouth had just opened London's first psychedelic boutique, Granny Takes a Trip, in the Kings Road. They worked together initially and very briefly under the name Cosmic Colors (producing only one poster) and then Jacob and the Coloured Coat (producing two posters), before settling on Hapshash and the Coloured Coat. Their posters were printed and distributed by Osiris Visions, a division of the underground press publication International Times.

They also released an album, titled Hapshash and the Coloured Coat Featuring the Human Host and the Heavy Metal Kids in 1967, and a second one, Western Flier, in 1969. By this time English had left, and Waymouth strangely is mentioned in the liner notes as having decided to "record" the album, but not listed as one of the musicians.

In 2000, the Victoria and Albert Museum put on an exhibition of their work.

See also



Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Hapshash and the Coloured Coat" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

Personal tools