Gross-out film  

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

Gross-out films are a sub-genre of comedy movies in which the producers aim to "gross out" their audience with disgusting and disturbing material, such as sexual or "toilet" humor.

In the USA, since the abolition of the Production Code and its replacement with the MPAA film rating system in the late 1960s, some filmmakers began to experiment with vulgar humor.

The first true "gross-out film" was 1972's Pink Flamingos and its infamous dog excrement eating scene, followed by 1974's sketch comedy sleeper The Groove Tube and 1978's National Lampoon's Animal House, which was a great success at the box office. Since the 1980s, gross-out films increased in number, and became the norm for comedy films. Some films of this genre could be aimed at teen audiences (such as Porky's or American Pie) or adult audiences (such as There's Something About Mary or Wedding Crashers).

Examples of the Gross-out Movie Genre




Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Gross-out film" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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