German humour  

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

German humour refers collectively to the conventions of comedy and its cultural meaning within the country of Germany. Although comedy is a staple of German culture, with many Germans making light of situations in social conversation, and with a large amount of time allotted to comedy in German television broadcasting, it is a widespread stereotype outside the country that Germans have little understanding (or a distorted understanding) of humorous situations. English-language jokes do not translate well because German grammar is less flexible. It does not always allow for a sentence to be reordered so as to delay the punchline, one of the most common joke formats for English speakers. New entities are named by creating compounds, sometimes resulting in extremely long words. This means that fewer words have multiple meanings, so there is less opportunity to create puns. German humour is more prone to make use of local dialects, customs and varieties, which are abundant but less easy to translate.

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Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "German humour" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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