German Archaeological Institute  

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

The German Archaeological Institute (Template:Lang-de, DAI) is an archaeological research institution, and a "scientific corporation" under the auspices of the German Foreign Office. It was founded by Otto Magnus von Stackelberg, Theodor Panofka and August Kestner in 1829 in Rome as the Instituto di corrispondenza archeologica, and since 1832 it has had its headquarters in Berlin, with offices in many other cities, currently including Madrid, Rome, Istanbul, Athens, Cairo, Damascus, Baghdad, Tehran and Sanaa. Its Romano-German Commission (Römisch-Germanische Kommission), including the world's largest library for prehistoric archaeology, is located in Frankfurt, its Commission for the history of classical antiquity in Munich and its Commission for the Archaeology of Non-European Cultures in Bonn. Since 2003 Hermann Parzinger has been its President.



Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "German Archaeological Institute" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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