Gabriel Huquier  

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
René Charpentier

Gabriel Huquier (1695 - 1772), established in rue Saint-Jacques, Paris, was a prominent printmaker and ornemaniste in an the Rococo taste, a pivotal figure in the production of French 18th-century ornamental etchings and engravings who was himself a collector of works of art, whose collections were dispersed at three great auction sales, in Amsterdam, 1761, in Paris, 1771, and after his death, in Paris, 1772. He was working from about 1731 until his apparent retirement in 1761. He engraved Watteau's designs, interpreting and adapting them so that he became the main source through whom Watteau's ornament was known in the 18th century and went on to etch and engrave designs of Jacques de Lajoue, François Boucher, Gilles-Marie Oppenord, Juste-Aurèle Meissonnier, Alexis Peyrotte, Nicolas Pineau and many other contemporary painters and designers. His portrait by Jean-Baptiste Perronneau is well known.

His son Jacques-Gabriel Huquier (1730–1805) known as Huquier fils, was also an engraver, as well as a portrait painter.




Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Gabriel Huquier" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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