Francophone literature  

From The Art and Popular Culture Encyclopedia

Jump to: navigation, search

Related e

Google
Wikipedia
Wiktionary
Wiki Commons
Wikisource
YouTube
Shop


Featured:
Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
Enlarge
Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

Francophone literature is literature written in the French language. Most often the term is misused to refer only to literature from francophone countries outside France, but this category includes French Literature, or Literature of France, that is literature written by French authors. Francophone literature therefore applies to the whole French-speaking world in the broadest sense of the term. In fact, the family includes all literature in French from countries where French is the native language (as in France, Quebec, and part of Belgium, the Grand Duchy of Luxemburg and Switzerland), where it is the official language (eg. in schools and government, see Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia, and a good portion of central Africa) or where it is just a vehicular language (eg. used for business purposes).

Francophone literature may refer to aspects of:

Examples of francophone writers

See also




Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Francophone literature" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

Personal tools