Framing (visual arts)  

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Scherzo di Follia (circa 1863-66): Virginia Oldoini, Countess of Castiglione photographed by French photographer Pierre-Louis Pierson. In the photo, Countess of Castiglione is depicted from the waist up. She looks at the camera through an small oval picture frame, isolating one of her eyes.
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Scherzo di Follia (circa 1863-66): Virginia Oldoini, Countess of Castiglione photographed by French photographer Pierre-Louis Pierson. In the photo, Countess of Castiglione is depicted from the waist up. She looks at the camera through an small oval picture frame, isolating one of her eyes.

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

In photography and cinematography, framing is a technique used to bring the focus to the subject.

Frames serve the double purpose of making a more aesthetically pleasing image and keeping the focus on the framed object(s). They add depth to the image, and can add a great deal to the picture when the frame is something related to the object being framed.

A very popular framing technique is Vignetting.

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Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Framing (visual arts)" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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