Folly (architecture)  

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Folly (disambiguation)

In architecture, a folly is an extravagant, frivolous or fanciful building, designed more for artistic expression than for practicality.

The term comes from the fact that such structures have often been dubbed "[name of architect or builder]'s Folly", in the sense of foolishness, fun or light-heartedness. Particularly because some follies were built by one individual alone, such as the massive complex by Ferdinand Cheval.

However, very few follies are completely without a practical purpose. Apart from their decorative aspect, many originally had a use which was lost later, such as hunting towers. Headley & Meulenkamp in Follies Grottoes & Garden Buildings defined a folly as a "misunderstood building".

Follies are often found in parks or large grounds of houses and stately homes. Some were deliberately built to look partially ruined. They were especially popular from the end of the 16th century to the 18th century.


Contents

Examples

Follies are found worldwide, but they are particularly abundant in Great Britain. See also.

Australia

France

Germany

Hungary

India

Ireland

Italy

Russia

Ukraine

United Kingdom

United States

See also

See also




Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Folly (architecture)" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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