Floral still life  

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Madonna and Child with Carnation (Cincinnati version, 1530-35) (flower detail) by Joos van Cleve
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Madonna and Child with Carnation (Cincinnati version, 1530-35) (flower detail) by Joos van Cleve

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

The floral still life[1] is a special kind of still life painting. Jan Brueghel the Elder[2] was one of the important innovators of the floral still life around 1600. These paintings, which presented immaculately observed arrangements and compositions, were imaginary creations of flowers that bloom at different times of the years. They were popular with leading patrons and nobility across Europe, and generally have an underlying Vanitas motif. The compositions of Brueghel's paintings were also influential on later Dutch flower pieces. Brueghel's sons Jan Brueghel the Younger and Ambrosius Brueghel were also flower specialists. Osias Beert (1580–1624) was another flower painter at the beginning of the 17th century. His paintings share many similarities with northern contemporaries such as Ambrosius Bosschaert the Elder.

Redouté was an heir to the tradition of the Flemish and Dutch flower painters Brueghel, Ruysch, van Huysum and de Heem.




Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Floral still life" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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