Fiorucci  

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"In the early 1980s Fiorucci commissioned Sottsass Associates to modernize the image of its shops. For this purpose linguistic elements that had already been identified in the work for Studio Alchimia were applied to the design." --Sholem Stein

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Fiorucci is an Italian fashion label founded by Elio Fiorucci. The label's heyday was the 1970s and the early 1980s when they celebrated the visual postmodernism introduced by the Memphis Group. In the early 1960s, Fiorucci was a small shoe shop in Milan owned and run by present Fiorucci tycoon Elio's father. The wealthy Milanese used to have their clothes and shoes made to order.

In 1962, Elio Fiorucci, then 22, took three pairs of brightly coloured plastic galoshes to a weekly Milan fashion magazine and convinced the editors to publish a photograph with them and Ecco. They became an overnight sensation, and a new Fiorucci was born. The Fiorucci Milan store began in 1967 as an alternative for shoppers.

London influences

Elio Fiorucci brought the youth culture from London and presented it to young Italians. The business brought T-shirts and jeans to Italian youths, who previously did not have ample opportunity to purchase such fashions. The Fiorucci trends tend to follow "mass cultural movements", such as the emergence of rock music, the ecology movement, political causees, etc. In the 70s, Fiorucci designers observed first-hand the advent of terrorism as a political tool, and they invented brightly coloured parachute cloth jumpsuits; they turned workmen's lunchboxes into purses, in both plastic and metal.

Styles

Fiorucci's style has been to take something ordinary and turn it into fashion. Elio Fiorucci splashed out on the American 1950s look and sold it back to the Americans and to the rest of the world. One of the favorite words in the Fiorucci lexicon is "recycle": it means reuse, change, reassemble, reinvent. To list a few of the looks popularized by Fiorucci: gold lamé (shoes, bags, boots, jeans, belts, luggage), fishnet stockings, fake animal skin fabrics, clothes in Lycra and Spandex, military fabric for "silly" clothes, little star prints and little stripes in bright candy colours.

In the early 1980s Fiorucci commissioned Sottsass Associates to modernize the image of its shops. For this purpose linguistic elements that had already been identified in the work for Alchimia were applied to the design.

Fiorucci has used an icon of two cherubic faces with wings as a logo on its shopping bags and other items. The design hearkens back the the famous Raphael cherub painting of two bored-looking angels.

Today

Today jeans are the centerpiece of the Fiorucci empire - they come in fuchsia, peach, periwinkle and jade. It is details that have made Fiorucci: the multi-coloured buttons running down the front of a man's shirt; the glimmer of metallic thread darting off the surface of an otherwise undistinguished plaid cotton; exactly what made those first Fiorucci Crayola-coloured galoshes unlike the rest of the dull galoshes in the world.

The Fiorucci empire has been split into shares that have been bought by various multinational corporations, but throughout the years and the changes, the Fiorucci look has remained true to itself: fun and anti-fashion.




Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Fiorucci" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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