Female spirits in Germanic paganism  

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

Female spirits and deities are a frequent element of recorded and reconstructed Germanic paganism and Norse mythology. Scholars, modern and medieval, record many varieties of female spirits or deities who were worshipped. However, some are attested only by single surviving references, linguistic evidence, or only scholarly conjecture. Because of that, there is not clear consensus among the sources as to how these different myths and beliefs should be grouped. The spirits were usually associated with battle or ancestor worship (for example guarding a particular family of descendants against harm).


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Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Female spirits in Germanic paganism" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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