F. Scott Fitzgerald  

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
American modernist literature

Francis Scott Key Fitzgerald (September 24, 1896December 21,1940) was an American author of novels and short stories best-known for the Jazz Age classic The Great Gatsby. Fitzgerald was of the self-styled "Lost Generation," Americans born in the 1890s who came of age during World War I. He finished four novels, left a fifth unfinished, and wrote dozens of short stories that treat themes of youth, despair, and age.

Quotations

"For a transitory enchanted moment man must have held his breath in the presence of this continent, compelled into an aesthetic contemplation he neither understood nor desired, face to face for the last time in history with something commensurate to his capacity for wonder."

Novels

Other works

Short Story Collections

Short Stories

Other




Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "F. Scott Fitzgerald" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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