Exposure (photography)  

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View from the Window at Le Gras is one of Nicéphore Niépce's earliest surviving photographs, circa 1826. Due to the 8 hour exposure, sunlight illuminates the buildings on both sides.
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View from the Window at Le Gras is one of Nicéphore Niépce's earliest surviving photographs, circa 1826. Due to the 8 hour exposure, sunlight illuminates the buildings on both sides.

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

In photography, exposure is the total amount of light allowed to fall on the photographic medium (photographic film or image sensor) during the process of taking a photograph. Exposure is measured in lux seconds, and can be computed from exposure value (EV) and scene luminance over a specified area.

In photographic jargon, an exposure generally refers to a single shutter cycle. For example: a long exposure refers to a single, protracted shutter cycle to capture enough low-intensity light, whereas a multiple exposure involves a series of relatively brief shutter cycles; effectively layering a series of photographs in one image. For the same film speed, the accumulated photometric exposure (H) should be similar in both cases.

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Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Exposure (photography)" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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