European counterculture  

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
counterculture, European culture

European counterculture connects with European avant-garde and European underground.

Contents

1960s

The 1960s counterculture movement took hold in Western Europe, with London, Amsterdam, Paris, Berlin and Rome rivaling San Francisco and New York as counterculture centers. One manifestation of this was the general strike that took place in Paris in May 1968, which nearly toppled the French government.

In Central Europe, young people adopted the song "San Francisco" as an anthem for freedom, and it was widely played during Czechoslovakia's 1968 "Prague Spring," a premature attempt to break away from Soviet repression.

As this newly emergent youth class began to criticize the established social order, new theories about cultural and personal identity began to spread, and traditional non-Western ideas – particularly with regard to religion, social organization and spiritual enlightenment – were more frequently embraced.

By region

Belgium

France

Italy

Spain

Portugal

Germany

See also: Germany

Poland

See also: Poland

The Netherlands

Great Britain

Guy Fawkes, Hellfire club, Eros in England, Censorship in the United Kingdom, UK Underground, British avant-garde

Sweden

Switzerland

See Swiss Brethren, Cabaret Voltaire, Dada

See also

Reference




Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "European counterculture" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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