Eroticism and Female Imagery in Nineteenth-Century Art  

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"Certain conventions of eroticism are so deeply ingrained that one scarcely bothers to think of them: one is that the very term “erotic art” is understood to imply the specification “erotic for men.”" --"Eroticism and Female Imagery in Nineteenth-Century Art"


"Equally unthinkable would be such an egregiously unrealistic erotopia as Turkish Bath, populated by sloe-eyed, close-pressed, languid youths, and painted by an octogenarian Mme Ingres." --"Eroticism and Female Imagery in Nineteenth-Century Art"


"In 1972, Linda Nochlin enlivened an annual convention of the CAA with a now-famous paper asserting that the term "erotic" as applied to traditional imagery of women really means "erotic-for-men." In her introduction to a session on "Eroticism and Female Imagery in Nineteenth-Century Art," Nochlin illustrated (partly by " --Naked Truths: Women, Sexuality and Gender in Classical Art and Archaeology, Ann Olga Koloski-Ostrow, ‎Claire L. Lyons, 2003.


"Consider for example the connections between Paul Gauguin's Two Tahitian Women with Mango Blossoms (1899) and Achetez des Pommes[1] , a nineteenth-century advertisement used by Linda Nochlin to explore the connections between spectatorship, gender and desire in her essay 'Eroticism and Female Imagery in Nineteenth-Century Art' (1972). Nochlin paired Achetez des Pommes with a photograph she made herself, titled Achetez des Bananes and showing a naked male figure displaying a tray of bananas just below his genitals." --Sarah Lucas: Au Naturel - Amna Malik - page 71, see Sarah Lucas

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

"Eroticism and Female Imagery in Nineteenth-Century Art" (1972) is a text by Linda Nochlin first brought as a speech to the College Art Association and later featured in Woman as Sex Object (1972). In it, Nochlin juxtaposed Achetez des Pommes[2] [Buy Apples], a French erotic photograph masquerading as an advertisment for apples, with a selfmade photograph ("Buy My Bananas") of a nude man offering bananas in a similar way to prove that "erotic art" means "erotic-for-men".

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