Engineering tolerance  

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

Engineering tolerance is the permissible limit or limits of variation in:

  1. a physical dimension,
  2. a measured value or physical property of a material manufactured object, system, or service,
  3. other measured values (such as temperature, humidity, etc.).
  4. in engineering and safety, a physical distance or space (tolerance), as in a truck (lorry), train or boat under a bridge as well as a train in a tunnel (see structure gauge and loading gauge).
  5. in mechanical engineering the space between a bolt and a nut or a hole, etc..

Dimensions, properties, or conditions may have some variation without significantly affecting functioning of systems, machines, structures, etc. A variation beyond the tolerance (for example, a temperature that's too hot or too cold) is said to be non-compliant, rejected, or exceeding the tolerance. If the tolerance is too restrictive, the machine being incapable of functioning in most environments, it is said to be intolerant.

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Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Engineering tolerance" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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