Embodiment  

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

Embodiment (from em- (in) and body and -ment) means:

  1. a physical entity typifying an abstraction
    You are the very embodiment of beauty.
synonyms
incarnation, epitome
see also disembodied

Embodied or embodiment may refer to:

in psychology and philosophy,

  • Embodied cognition (or the embodied mind thesis), a position in cognitive science and the philosophy of mind emphasizing the role that the body plays in shaping the mind
  • Embodied imagination, a therapeutic and creative form of working with dreams and memories

in computer science, robotics and artificial intelligence,

  • Embodied Embedded Cognition, a position in cognitive science stating that intelligent behaviour emerges from the interplay between brain, body and world
  • Embodied agent, in artificial intelligence, an intelligent agent that interacts with the environment through a physical body within that environment
  • Embodied cognitive science, an interdisciplinary field of research aiming to explain the mechanisms underlying intelligent behavior

in resource economics,

  • Embodied resource, the amount of resource used in the production, manufacture, use and disposal of a good or service.
  • Embodied energy, the quantity of energy required to manufacture, and supply to the point of use, a product, material or service
  • Embodied or virtual water, the water used in the production of a good or service

in physical theatre training,

  • Process of embodiment (physical theatre) the process of embodiment, the specific part of psychophysical actor training based on the embodied mind thesis that seeks to unite the imaginary separation of body and mind

in music,

in law,

  • a specific, disclosed example of how an inventive concept, that is more generally stated elsewhere in the disclosure of a patent application or patent, can be put into practice; see Claim (patent).

in social epidemiology,

  • Embodiment, the development of a body through the change of a certain environment or condition, this includes geographical location, socioeconomic status, etc.
  • Embodiment, the change or nurturing of a natural biological entity induced by their specific environment
  • Embodiment, the telling of a body's story that cannot be refuted from the environment in which it was developed in; which also oftentimes refutes popular opinion and expresses changes that are unable to be verbalized

See also





Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Embodiment" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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