Eisenhower's farewell address  

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"We must guard against the acquisition of unwarranted influence, whether sought or unsought, by the military–industrial complex." --Dwight D. Eisenhower, Eisenhower's farewell address, January 17, 1961

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

Eisenhower's farewell address (sometimes referred to as "Eisenhower's farewell address to the nation"was the final public speech of Dwight D. Eisenhower as the 34th President of the United States, delivered in a television broadcast on January 17, 1961. Perhaps best known for advocating that the nation guard against the potential influence of the military–industrial complex, a term he is credited with coining, the speech also expressed concerns about planning for the future and the dangers of massive spending, especially deficit spending, the prospect of the domination of science through Federal funding and, conversely, the domination of science-based public policy by what he called a "scientific-technological elite". This speech and Eisenhower's Chance for Peace speech have been called the "bookends" of his administration.



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