Douglas Coupland  

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

Douglas Coupland (born December 30, 1961) is a Canadian fiction writer as well as a playwright and visual artist. His first book, the 1991 novel Generation X: Tales for an Accelerated Culture, was nominated for the Books in Canada First Novel Award, became an international bestseller and popularized the terms "McJob" and "Generation X". Much of Coupland's work explores the unexpected cultural shifts created by the impact of new technologies on middle class North American culture. Persistent themes include the conflict between secular and religious values, difficulty in aging and taking on adult roles, ironic attitudes as a response to intense media saturation, and pop and mass culture.



Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Douglas Coupland" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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