Dingbat  

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

A dingbat is an ornament, character or spacer used in typesetting, sometimes more formally known as a printer's ornament or printer's character. The term continues to be used in the computer industry to describe fonts that have symbols and shapes in the positions designated for alphabetical or numeric characters.

Examples of characters included in Unicode (ITC Zapf Dingbats series 100 and others):

 
 

The advent of Unicode and the universal character set it provides allowed commonly used dingbats to be given their own character codes, from 2700 to 27BF (hexadecimal). Although fonts claiming Unicode coverage will contain glyphs for dingbats in addition to alphabetic characters, fonts that have dingbats in place of alphabetic characters continue to be popular, primarily for ease of input. Such fonts are also sometimes known as pi fonts.

Some of the dingbat symbols have been used as signature marks, used in bookbinding to order sections.

Unicode dingbats

Dingbats were added to the Unicode Standard in June, 1993, with the release of version 1.1. This code block contains decorative character variants, and other marks of emphasis and non-textual symbolism.

The Unicode block for Dingbats is U+2700–U+27BF:


See also

Dingbat fonts




Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Dingbat" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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