Defamation  

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Nocturne in Black and Gold – The Falling Rocket  (c. 1874-77) by James McNeill Whistler caused controversy after art critic John Ruskin commented that Whistler had flung "a pot of paint in the public's face". Whistler subsequently sued Ruskin for defamation.
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Nocturne in Black and Gold – The Falling Rocket (c. 1874-77) by James McNeill Whistler caused controversy after art critic John Ruskin commented that Whistler had flung "a pot of paint in the public's face". Whistler subsequently sued Ruskin for defamation.

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

In law, defamation is the communication of a statement that makes a false or malicious claim, expressly stated or implied to be factual, that may harm the reputation of an individual, business, product, group, government or nation. Most jurisdictions allow legal actions, civil and/or criminal, to deter various kinds of defamation and retaliate against criticism.

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Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Defamation" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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