Culture war  

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

The culture war or culture conflict refers to the conflict between traditionalist or conservative values and social democracy, progressive or social liberal values in the Western world, as well as other countries. Culture wars have influenced the debate over public school history and science curricula in the United States, along with many other issues.

The expression culture war entered the vocabulary of United States politics with the publication of Culture Wars: The Struggle to Define America by James Davison Hunter in 1991. Hunter perceived a dramatic realignment and polarization that had transformed United States politics and culture, including the issues of abortion, federal and state gun laws, global warming, immigration, separation of church and state, privacy, recreational drug use, LGBT rights, and censorship.

See also

Battleground issues in the "culture wars"

Life issues
Sexuality
Education and parenting
Drugs
Environment and Energy
Society and culture
Law and Government




Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Culture war" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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