Cultural appropriation  

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This page Cultural appropriation is part of the culture series Illustration: A 1900 William H. West minstrel show poster, originally published by the Strobridge Litho Co., shows the transformation from white to "black".
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This page Cultural appropriation is part of the culture series
Illustration: A 1900 William H. West minstrel show poster, originally published by the Strobridge Litho Co., shows the transformation from white to "black".

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

Cultural appropriation is the adoption or appropriation of some specific elements of one culture by a different cultural group. It denotes acculturation or assimilation, but often connotes a negative view towards acculturation from a minority culture by a dominant culture. It can include the introduction of forms of dress or personal adornment, music and art, religion, language, or social behavior. These elements, once removed from their indigenous cultural contexts, may take on meanings that are significantly divergent from, or merely less nuanced than, those they originally held. Or, they may be stripped of meaning altogether.

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Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Cultural appropriation" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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