Country rock  

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
See rockabilly, garage rock, Cultural appropriation in western music, Music history of the United States (1960s and 70s) and Sweetheart of the Rodeo'
"Along with Bradley's Barn by The Beau Brummels, the Everly Brothers' Roots, Bob Dylan's John Wesley Harding and Safe at Home by The International Submarine Band, Sweetheart of the Rodeo by The Byrds serve as the seminal recordings of country rock." --Sholem Stein

Country rock is a musical genre formed from the fusion of rock with country music, with its roots in the American folk music revival.

While such cross-pollination has occurred throughout the history of both genres, the term is usually used to refer to the wave of groups of the late 1960s and early 1970s who began to record country flavored records, including The Dillards, The Byrds, Gene Clark, The Flying Burrito Brothers, Gram Parsons, Neil Young, Michael Nesmith, The Band, Bob Dylan, and The Buffalo Springfield. These musicians grew up listening to early country music on the radio in the 1950s, and were also influenced by the emergence of rock & roll in the 1960s. The Beatles according to Gram Parsons also were recording songs with a strong country influence like I'll Cry Instead and I Don't Want to Spoil the Party in 1964.

Pop-rock

Pop-rock acts like The Grateful Dead, The Byrds and The Flying Burrito Brothers moved folk rock in a different direction. Drawing on their folk roots, and inspired by the hugely influential late 60's albums by Bob Dylan and The Band, they fused pop and rock with American country music and bluegrass music, creating the genre known as country rock.

Anglo-American folk music

Although these trends in what might be termed "folk-pop-fusion" were all significant in their own way, and they were clearly part of the process of cultural appropriation, such experiments by popular musicians, and the availability of recorded collections of "authentic" performances of English and American folk music, began to lead many curious listeners to explore these genres. This in turn would pave the way for the development of the "world music" concept in later years.

See also

Outlaw country
Southern rock
List of country rock albums



Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Country rock" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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