Concrete  

From The Art and Popular Culture Encyclopedia

Jump to: navigation, search
The usage of new materials such as iron, steel, concrete and glass is ascribed an important place, with the Crystal Palace by Joseph Paxton to house the Great Exhibition of 1851. Historians have seen the Crystal Palace as a reaction to the eclecticism and "poor taste" of the Victorian Era fuelled by the possibilities of the Industrial Revolution.
Enlarge
The usage of new materials such as iron, steel, concrete and glass is ascribed an important place, with the Crystal Palace by Joseph Paxton to house the Great Exhibition of 1851. Historians have seen the Crystal Palace as a reaction to the eclecticism and "poor taste" of the Victorian Era fuelled by the possibilities of the Industrial Revolution.

Related e

Google
Wikipedia
Wiktionary
Wiki Commons
Wikisource
YouTube
Shop


Featured:
The Birth of Venus (detail), a 1486 painting by Sandro Botticelli
Enlarge
The Birth of Venus (detail), a 1486 painting by Sandro Botticelli

Concrete is a composite widely used for making architectural structures.

Famous concrete structures include the Hoover Dam, the Panama Canal and the Roman Pantheon.

Concrete technology was known by the ancient Romans and was widely used in the Roman Empire—the Colosseum was built largely of concrete and the concrete dome of the Pantheon is the world's largest. After the Empire was destroyed, use of concrete became scarce until the technology was re-pioneered in the mid-18th century.

See also




Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Concrete" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

Personal tools