Competition  

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

Competition can be two things, one of those things is to battle against mostly individuals but sometimes groups, for the purpose of achieving money, pride, reputation, gain or just for fun. The second is to really be universal, pretty broad and think about one's self and kind of not doing the right thing or to do some thing dangerously. It is a term that is commonly used in numerous fields, including business, economics, law, politics, ecology, music, and sports but there are many other possibilties also, for example a game show. Competition may be between two or more forces, systems, individuals, groups, or networks, depending on the context in which the term is used. Competition may yield various results, including both intrinsic and extrinsic rewards. Some results, such as resources or territory, may be biologically motivated because they provide survival advantages. Others, such as competition in business and politics, are learned aspects of human culture. Additionally, extrinsic symbols such as trophies, plaques, ribbons, prizes, or laudations may be given to the winner. Such symbolic rewards are commonly used in human sporting and academic competitions.

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Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Competition" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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