Interpersonal relationship  

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This page Interpersonal relationship is part of the psychology series  Illustration: The Heart Has Its Reasons (c.1887) by Odilon Redon  What makes us like new acquaintances is not so much any weariness of our old ones, or the pleasure of change, as disgust at not being sufficiently admired by those who know us too well, and the hope of being more so by those who do not know so much of us. --Reflections; or Sentences and Moral Maxims, François de La Rochefoucauld.
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This page Interpersonal relationship is part of the psychology series
Illustration: The Heart Has Its Reasons (c.1887) by Odilon Redon
What makes us like new acquaintances is not so much any weariness of our old ones, or the pleasure of change, as disgust at not being sufficiently admired by those who know us too well, and the hope of being more so by those who do not know so much of us. --Reflections; or Sentences and Moral Maxims, François de La Rochefoucauld.
Innocence (1893) by William-Adolphe Bouguereau: Both young children and lambs are symbols of innocence
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Innocence (1893) by William-Adolphe Bouguereau: Both young children and lambs are symbols of innocence
Fashionable Contrasts (1792) by James Gillray  Interpersonal relationship is part of the interpersonal relations portal
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Fashionable Contrasts (1792) by James Gillray
Interpersonal relationship is part of the interpersonal relations portal

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

An interpersonal relationship is a strong, deep, or close association or acquaintance between two or more people that may range in duration from brief to enduring. This association may be based on inference, love, solidarity, support, regular business interactions, or some other type of social commitment. Interpersonal relationships thrive through equitable and reciprocal compromise, they are formed in the context of social, cultural and other influences. The context can vary from family or kinship relations, friendship, marriage, relations with associates, work, clubs, neighborhoods, and places of worship. They may be regulated by law, custom, or mutual agreement, and are the basis of social groups and society as a whole.


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