Communication  

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Loisirs Littéraires au XXe siècle (English: "Literary leasures in the 20th century"), an illustration from the story "The End of Books" by French writer Octave Uzanne and illustrator Albert Robida.
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Loisirs Littéraires au XXe siècle (English: "Literary leasures in the 20th century"), an illustration from the story "The End of Books" by French writer Octave Uzanne and illustrator Albert Robida.
This page Communication is part of the linguistics series. Illustration: a close-up of a mouth in the film The Big Swallow (1901)
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This page Communication is part of the linguistics series.
Illustration: a close-up of a mouth in the film The Big Swallow (1901)
Pollice Verso (1872) by Jean-Léon Gérôme
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Pollice Verso (1872) by Jean-Léon Gérôme
Awful conflagration of the steam boat Lexington in Long Island Sound on Monday eveg., January 13th 1840, by which melancholy occurence; over 100 persons perished.  Courier lithograph documenting a news event, published three days after the disaster.
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Awful conflagration of the steam boat Lexington in Long Island Sound on Monday eveg., January 13th 1840, by which melancholy occurence; over 100 persons perished. Courier lithograph documenting a news event, published three days after the disaster.

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
visual communication

Communication is a process that allows beings - in particular humans - to exchange information by one of several methods. Communication requires that some kinds of symbols from a kind of language are exchanged. There are auditory means, such as speaking or singing, and nonverbal, physical means, such as body language, sign language, paralanguage, touch or eye contact.

Communication happens at many levels (even for one single action), in many different ways, and for all beings, and some machines. Many or all, fields of study dedicate some attention to communication, so when speaking about communication it is very important to be sure about what aspect of communication one is speaking about. Some definitions are broad, recognizing that animals can communicate with each other as well as human beings, and some are more narrow, only including human beings within the parameters of human symbolic interaction.

Nonetheless, communication is usually described along a few major dimensions:

  1. Content (what type of things are communicated)
  2. Source (by whom)
  3. Form (in which form)
  4. Channel (through which medium)
  5. Destination/Receiver (to whom)
  6. Purpose/Pragmatic aspect (with what kind of results)

Between parties, communication content include acts that declare knowledge and experiences, give advice and commands, and ask questions. These acts may take many forms, including all variations of nonverbal communication. The form depends on the symbol systems used. Together, communication content and form make messages that are sent towards a destination. The target can be oneself, another person (in interpersonal communication), or another entity (such as a corporation or group).

Depending on the focus (who, what, in which form, to whom, to which effect), there exist various classifications. Some of those systematical questions are elaborated in Communication theory.

See also




Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Communication" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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