Coming Apart (film)  

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

Coming Apart is a 1969 American film directed by Milton Moses Ginsberg starring Rip Torn.

Coming Apart strongly reminds of another zeitgeist-reflecting film concerned with male angst and the war of the sexes: La Maman et la Putain. Three years before Jean Eustache's masterpiece/oddity, Ginsberg already has a very 'literary' approach to capture 'the real' and proposes duration (long takes, static camera) to cinematically fetishize reality.

One of the most memorable scenes where a young pregnant mother visits the protagonist psychiatrist ("it's worth a million dollars to me") reminds of It is not four years ago, a poem by John Suckling.

Plot

New York psychiatrist Joe Glazer, who is going through a divorce, rents an apartment under the assumed name of Glassman and installs a hidden movie camera in a mirrored box to record his life and occasionally talk to. Most of the people who visit his apartment are women, including Joann, a former patient; Monica, an ex-mistress; and Karen, the wife of one of his best friends. Joe has sexual encounters with some of them. The camera records Joe's words and actions as well as his ongoing mental breakdown.

Cast




Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Coming Apart (film)" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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