Comedy masks of ancient Roman theatre  

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In Ancient Roman comedy, one actor played all the parts in the performance (wearing masks), danced and mimed while a chorus narrated or told the story he was acting out to music. At first masks were common because actors would play multiple characters and the masks made them easier to distinguish. Over time the comedic masks became grotesquely exaggerated.

Notable mosaics in the Mosaic Collection Naples include two Roman comedy masks [1], [2] from the House of the Faun. The first mask is a detail from the mosaic of Eros-Bacchus on the tiger.

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Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Comedy masks of ancient Roman theatre" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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