Charles Martel  

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Edward Gibbon wrote that were it not for Charles Martel that "Perhaps the interpretation of the Koran would now be taught in the schools of Oxford, and her pulpits might demonstrate to a circumcised people the sanctity and truth of the revelation of Mahomet. . . . From such calamities was Christendom delivered by the genius and fortune of one man." --Edward Gibbon: History Of The Decline And Fall Of The Roman Empire, Volume 5, page 156 - 157


Charles Martel cemented his place in history with his defense of Christian Europe against a Muslim army at the Battle of Tours in 732."

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

Charles Martel (c. 686 – 22 October 741) was a Frankish statesman and military leader who was de facto ruler of Francia from 718 until his death.

In October 732, the army of the Umayyad Caliphate led by Al Ghafiqi met Frankish and Burgundian forces under Charles in an area between the cities of Tours and Poitiers (modern north-central France), leading to a decisive, historically important Frankish victory known as the Battle of Tours (or ma'arakat Balâṭ ash-Shuhadâ, Battle of the Palace of Martyrs), ending the "last of the great Arab invasions of France," a military victory termed "brilliant" on the part of Charles.




Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Charles Martel" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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