Charles B. Griffith  

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

Charles B. Griffith (September 23 1930September 28 2007) was a Chicago-born screenwriter, best known for writing Roger Corman productions such as A Bucket of Blood, The Little Shop of Horrors, and Death Race 2000.

He was credited with 29 movies, but is known to have written many more. He had also directed at least six films, acted in six films, was second unit director in six films, produced three films and was production manager of two films.

With a career spanning decades, he is often cited as the father of American black comedy.

During the late fifties and early sixties, Griffith created both redneck classics such as Eat My Dust and black comedies such as A Bucket of Blood and The Little Shop of Horrors. He had a small role in It Conquered the World, which he also wrote, as Dr. Pete Shelton.

Griffith died on September 28 2007 in San Diego, aged 77, from undisclosed causes.




Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Charles B. Griffith" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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