Censorship in the United States  

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A typical image from Perversion for Profit: a photograph taken from a lesbian pornography magazine and censored with colored rectangles

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
Censorship of obscenity in the United States

In the United States certain forms of speech, such as obscenity and defamation, are restricted in major media outlets by the government or by the industry on its own.

For much of the United States's history, the First Amendment was not held to apply to states and municipalities. Entities without any prohibition in their own charters were free to censor newspapers, magazines, books, plays, movies, comedy shows, and so on. Many did, as exemplified by the phrase "banned in Boston."

The free speech decisions of the United States Supreme Court under Chief Justice Earl Warren, which served from 1953 to 1969, extended the protections of the First Amendment to local government, and brought much stricter standards of review for what government actions were acceptable.

The state of Maryland retained its movie ratings board an unusually long time, abandoning it in the 1980s in favor of the private MPAA's voluntary ratings scheme.

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Documentary films




Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Censorship in the United States" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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