Catalogue raisonné  

From The Art and Popular Culture Encyclopedia

Jump to: navigation, search

Related e

Google
Wikipedia
Wiktionary
Wiki Commons
Wikiquote
Wikisource
YouTube
Shop


Featured:
Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
Enlarge
Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

A catalogue raisonné is a monograph giving a comprehensive catalogue of artworks by an artist. It normally provides:

  • Photographs of every work discussed
  • Provenance (where the work has been) for every individual work
  • List of the literature ("literaturverzeichnis") that discusses the work
  • Size of every work
  • Condition reports of every work
  • Disputed, questionable and spurious works
  • Introductory essay discussion the artist's life (generally shorter than a whole monograph on the artist)
  • Example signatures
  • Indices, listing each work:
    • By its current location (city/museum)
    • By its previous owners
    • By the scholars who has commented on it

Often paintings, prints or drawings only (or sculpture, ceramics etc if appropriate) are discussed in a particular catalogue, and sometimes only a certain period of the artist's life is covered.

It contains most of the information a researcher will need up to the year the catalogue raisonné was printed. In particular they are important references for attributions - which paintings are actually by a given artist.

A catalogue raisonné may be regarded as the prime source of information about an artist's work, and allows one to see the full range of work in sequence.

Because artwork can be widely distributed, and some owners may not wish for high quality images to be made available, some photographic reproductions of works may be only in black and white and/or small in size. Works since destroyed may exist only as old photographs or prints.

Catalogue raisonnés are typically expensive to produce because of the sheer volume of pages and photographic reproductions required, and generally have a limited market. Thus, they usually carry a high price and are rarely reprinted.

The term catalogue raisonné is French, meaning "reasoned catalogue" (ie with arguments for, for example, attributions given) and has wide usage in English. The spelling is never Americanized to "catalog," even in the United States.




Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Catalogue raisonné" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

Personal tools