Carol Reed  

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

Sir Carol Reed (30 December, 190625 April, 1976) was an English film director, winner of an Academy Award for his film version of the musical, Oliver! (1968).

An illegitimate son of actor-producer Sir Herbert Beerbohm Tree and his mistress, May Pinney Reed, Carol Reed was born in Putney, London, and educated at The King's School, Canterbury.

Reed served in the British Army during the Second World War, giving him many experiences which appeared in his later films. He embarked on an acting career while still in his teens, but soon went into the role of producer/director, and was responsible for The Stars Look Down (1939), Kipps (1941), Odd Man Out (1947), The Fallen Idol (1948), The Third Man (1949), Outcast of the Islands (1952), Our Man in Havana (1959), and The Agony and the Ecstasy (1965), becoming a prime essayist of film versions of the novels of Graham Greene.

From 1943 until 1947, he was married to the elegant British film star Diana Wynyard. After their divorce, he married, in 1948, the actress Penelope Dudley Ward, also known as Pempie, the elder daughter of Freda Dudley Ward, who had been a mistress of the Prince of Wales, later Edward VIII of the United Kingdom and Duke of Windsor. They had one son, Max, and a nephew was the actor Oliver Reed. His stepdaughter, Miss Ward's daughter, Tracy Reed, acted in numerous films, notably as the only woman in Dr. Strangelove.





Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Carol Reed" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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