Candido Camero  

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

Candido Camero (born April 22, 1921) is Cuban percussionist (mainly conga and bongo) who backed many Afro-Cuban jazz and straightforward jazz acts since the 1950s.

Early on he had recorded in his native Cuba with Machito. He moved to New York in 1952 and started recording with Dizzy Gillespie. During 1953-54 he was in the Billy Taylor quartet and in 1954 he performed and recorded with Stan Kenton. He also enjoyed some hits during the disco era, most notably with the Babatunde Olatunji penned track "Jingo" which he recorded for Salsoul Records, which was off the Dancin' and Prancin' album. At 88, Candido continues to wow crowds with his unique talent, and charm. On January 15, 2009 he was the surprise guest at Zinc, a jazz club in New York City's famed Greenwich Village.

He was honoured with the National Endowment for the Arts Jazz Masters Award. A great performance with Kenny Burrell on his 'first blue note sessions'; available on the CD 'Introducing Kenny Burrell'.

Discography

As leader

As sideman

With Grant Green

With Ellen McIlwaine




Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Candido Camero" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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