Candaulism  

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

Candaulism is a fantasy, in which the husband exposes his wife, or pictures of her, to other voyeurist people for pleasure; hence the term candaulism which derives its name (proposed by Gugitz) from ancient King Candaules who made a plot to show his unaware naked wife to his servant Gyges of Lydia. Discovering Gyges while he was watching her naked, Candaules' wife ordered him to choose between killing himself or killing her husband in order to repair the vicious mischief. This 'incident' was featured in Herodotus's Histories and in André Gide's Le Roi Candaule.

Sometimes this behavior is taken to the extreme point, allowing complete sexual relations, a practice defined by many English speaking people in the swinging subculture as cuckoldry. In certain cases the relation evolves into a stable union of three persons that is known as triolism.

Candaulists in history

This is a list of seduced, sexually unfaithful wives, happily married for many years to famous consenting men (who deliberately ignored, tolerated, approved, encouraged, or even induced the non innocent nude exposition or promiscuous sexual behavior of their spouses, all facts fully proven, and widely known to the public). These persons/characters must have a relevance in arts, history, literature, science, cinema or cartoons, not belong to the world of pornography, and have stable relationships extending over many years.

Filmography

See also




Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Candaulism" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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