Breton language  

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Kunstformen der Natur (1904) by Ernst Haeckel
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Kunstformen der Natur (1904) by Ernst Haeckel

Breton is a Celtic language spoken in Brittany (Template:Lang-br; Template:Lang-fr), France. Breton is a Brittonic language brought from Great Britain to Armorica by migrating Britons during the Early Middle Ages; it is thus an Insular Celtic language and not closely related to the Gaulish language. Breton is most closely related to Cornish, as both are Southwestern Brittonic languages. Welsh and the extinct Cumbric are the more distantly-related Brittonic languages.

The other regional language of Brittany, Gallo, is a langue d'oïl derived from Latin and is consequently relatively close to French.

Having declined from more than one million speakers around 1950 to about 200,000 in the first decade of the 21st century, of whom 61% are more than 60 years old, Breton is classified as "severely endangered" by the UNESCO Atlas of the World's Languages in Danger. However, the number of children attending bilingual classes has risen 33% between 2006 and 2012 to 14,709.

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Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Breton language" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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