Brain Sex  

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
Biology of gender

Brain Sex is a popular book about the biology of gender, the biological differences between men and women, by Anne Moir (geneticist) and David Jessel (journalist), first published by Michael Joseph (a division of Penguin) in 1989.

Moir and Jessel provide a great deal of evidence and discussion throughout the book. They conclude with a summary, which includes the following decisive statement.

"We find a political and social view — that men and women should be treated equally — somehow dependent upon a belief that men and women are the same. They are not. There is no longer any excuse, save mental indolence, to believe that
'Many of the generally understood distinctions between the sexes in the more significant areas of role and temperament, not to mention status, have in fact essentially cultural rather than biological bases.' This isn't a prescriptive book; it merely explains how the brains of the sexes are different, and attempts to link those differences with the observably different behaviour of men and women — which men and women have been celebrating or bemoaning for centuries."




Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Brain Sex" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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