Bombing of Dresden in World War II  

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

The Bombing of Dresden was a strategic military attack on the city of Dresden, the capital of the German state of Saxony, that took place in the final months of the Second World War. In four raids between 13 February and 15 February 1945, 1,300 heavy bombers of the British Royal Air Force (RAF) and the United States Army Air Force (USAAF) dropped more than 3,900 tons of high-explosive bombs and incendiary devices on the city. The resulting firestorm destroyed 15 square miles (39 square kilometres) of the city centre and caused many civilian casualties. Post-war discussion of whether or not the attacks were justified has led to the bombing becoming one of the moral causes célèbres of the Second World War.

Art destruction

The Stone Breakers by Courbet was destroyed in the Bombing of Dresden, February 1945.



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