Combined oral contraceptive pill  

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"For [ the pill ] is a revolutionary development, probably to be ranked among the half dozen or so major innovations in man's two or more million years of history. In its effects I believe that the pill ranks in importance with the discovery of fire."--Sex, Man, and Society (1969) by Ashley Montagu


"The pill was approved by the FDA in the early 1960s; its use spread rapidly in the late part of that decade, generating an enormous social impact. Time magazine placed the pill on its cover in April, 1967."--Sholem Stein

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Kunstformen der Natur (1904) by Ernst Haeckel
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Kunstformen der Natur (1904) by Ernst Haeckel

The Combined Oral Contraceptive Pill (COCP), often referred to as "the Pill", is a birth control method, taken orally. It was first approved for contraceptive use in the United States in 1960, and are a very popular form of birth control.

The pill was approved by the FDA in the early 1960s; its use spread rapidly in the late part of that decade, generating an enormous social impact. Time magazine placed the pill on its cover in April, 1967.

The sexual revolution

One suggested trigger for the modern sexual revolution was the development of the birth control pill in 1960, which gave women access to easy and reliable contraception.



Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Combined oral contraceptive pill" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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