William Levy (author)  

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

William Levy (born January 10, 1939), known as the Talmudic Wizard of Amsterdam and Dr. Doo-Wop, is the author of such works as The Virgin Sperm Dancer, Wet Dreams, Certain Radio Speeches of Ezra Pound and Natural Jewboy.

Before leaving the U.S. in the autumn of 1966 aboard the R.M.S Queen Mary, Mr. Levy attended the University of Maryland and Temple University and taught in the literature department at Shippensburg State College, in Pennsylvania. In the sixties and seventies, he was founder and chief-editor of many magazines such as: The Insect Trust Gazette, International Times, Suck, and The Fanatic. He also contributed three articles to London Oz as Bill Levy. Recently, he served as European Editor for American glossy fanzines High Times and Penthouse Magazine and as an associate editor of Amsterdam zines Het Gewicht, Ins & Outs, La Linea and Atom Club.

Mr. Levy has been a regular contributor to Andrei Codrescu's Exquisite Corpse and Libido and is currently publisher of Transactions of the Invisible Language Society series. His meditation play Europe in Flames was also featured at the Festival of New Radio in New York. In 1998, Mr. Levy was awarded the Erotic Oscar for writing at London's Sex Maniac's Ball. Mr. Levy's alter-ego, Dr. Doo Wop, can be heard weekly spinning groovy music across Amsterdam's airwaves.

Mr. Levy currently lives in Amsterdam with his wife, the literary translator Susan Janssen.





Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "William Levy (author)" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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