Bertolt Brecht  

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

Bertolt Brecht (born February 10, 1898 – August 14, 1956) was an influential German socialist, dramatist, stage director, and poet. He is best-known for such plays as Mother Courage and Her Children and The Threepenny Opera, as well as his only screenplay Hangmen Also Die. One of Brecht's most important principles was what he called the Verfremdungseffekt.

Contents

Works

Fiction

Plays

Entries show: English-language translation of title (German-language title) [year written] / [year first produced]

Poems

Theoretical works

  • The Modern Theatre is the Epic Theatre (1930)
  • The Threepenny Lawsuit (Der Dreigroschenprozess) (written 1931; published 1932)
  • The Book of Changes (fragment also known as Me-Ti; written 1935–1939)
  • The Street Scene (written 1938; published 1950)
  • The Popular and the Realistic (written 1938; published 1958)
  • Short Description of a New Technique of Acting which Produces an Alienation Effect (written 1940; published 1951)
  • A Short Organum for the Theatre ("Kleines Organon für das Theater", written 1948; published 1949)
  • The Messingkauf Dialogues (Dialogue aus dem Messingkauf, published 1963)


Brecht in fiction




Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Bertolt Brecht" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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