Symphony No. 5 (Beethoven)  

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Beethoven's Fifth is said to be "Mona Lisa" of classical music Illustration: Mona Lisa by Leonardo da Vinci.
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Beethoven's Fifth is said to be "Mona Lisa" of classical music
Illustration: Mona Lisa by Leonardo da Vinci.

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

The Symphony No. 5 in C minor of Ludwig van Beethoven, Op. 67, was written in 1804–1808. It Is one of the most popular and best-known compositions in classical music, and one of the most frequently played symphonies. First performed in Vienna's Theater an der Wien in 1808, the work achieved its prodigious reputation soon afterwards. E. T. A. Hoffmann described the symphony as "one of the most important works of the time".

The symphony, and the four-note opening motif in particular, are well known worldwide, with the motif appearing frequently in popular culture, from disco to rock and roll, to appearances in film and television.



Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Symphony No. 5 (Beethoven)" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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