Beelzebub  

From The Art and Popular Culture Encyclopedia

Jump to: navigation, search
Image:Michael Pacher detail.jpg
This page Beelzebub is part of the devil in popular culture series. Illustration: detail from Michael Pacher's panel painting The Devil Presenting St Augustine With The Book Of Vices

Related e

Google
Wikipedia
Wiktionary
Wiki Commons
Wikisource
YouTube
Shop


Featured:
Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
Enlarge
Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

Beelzebub (literally "Lord of the Flies"), with numerous archaic variants, is a Semitic deity that was worshiped in the Philistine city of Ekron. In later Christian and Biblical sources, he is referred to as another name for Devil, and in Christian demonology, is one of the seven princes of Hell according to Christian views on Hell.

Overview

Ba‘al Zebûb or Ba‘al Zəvûv (Hebrew בעל זבוב, with numerous variants appears as the name of a deity worshipped in the Philistine city of Ekron.

In ancient contexts, there appears to have been little, if any, meaningful distinction between Beelzebub and the polytheistic Semitic god named Ba‘al. Monotheistic Jewish reference to Baal was almost certainly pejorative, and grew to be used among other terms for Satan. The name later appears as the name of a demon or devil, often interchanged with Beelzebul.

Examination has sought to interpret the meaning of Baal in context to determine the specific reasons for this connotation, and varied religious speculations have run the gamut. It is generally unknown whether and to what extent the anti-pagan sentiment of early Hebrews was based in an anti-matriarchal view, or else a developed dislike for the customary pagan fertility rites. Regardless, the demonization of the deity or deification is thought to have been one basis for the personification of Satan as the adversary of the Abrahamic God, though other influences such as the Zoroastrian Daeva may have contributed.

See also




Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Beelzebub" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

Personal tools