Bad taste  

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"In order to acquire bad taste one must first have very good taste." -- John Waters


"Ah, good taste! What a dreadful thing. [Good] taste is the enemy of creativity." --Picasso, unsubstantiated [1]


"Lasciva nobis pagina, vita proba"-- Martial

This page Bad taste is part of the queer series.Illustration: Toulouse-Lautrec wearing Jane Avril's Feathered Hat and Boa (ca. 1892), photo Maurice Guibert.
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This page Bad taste is part of the queer series.
Illustration: Toulouse-Lautrec wearing Jane Avril's Feathered Hat and Boa (ca. 1892), photo Maurice Guibert.
The usage of new materials such as iron, steel, concrete and glass is ascribed an important place, with the Crystal Palace by Joseph Paxton to house the Great Exhibition of 1851. Historians have seen the Crystal Palace as a reaction to the eclecticism and "poor taste" of the Victorian Era fuelled by the possibilities of the Industrial Revolution.
Enlarge
The usage of new materials such as iron, steel, concrete and glass is ascribed an important place, with the Crystal Palace by Joseph Paxton to house the Great Exhibition of 1851. Historians have seen the Crystal Palace as a reaction to the eclecticism and "poor taste" of the Victorian Era fuelled by the possibilities of the Industrial Revolution.

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

Bad taste is the quality of any object or idea that does not fall within the normal social standards of taste. Varying from society to society and from time to time, bad taste is generally thought of as a negative thing, but also changes with each individual.

Some varieties of black humor employ bad taste for its shock value, such as the films Pink Flamingos or the appropriately titled Bad Taste. Similarly, some artists deliberately create vulgar or kitsch works of art to defy critical standards or social norms. Some artists argue that the only things that is in really bad taste or that is vulgar, is kitsch. Despite the economic risks, some retailers also deliberately design and sell objects which would ordinarily be regarded as vulgar, relying on inflated price tags to instill an Emperor's new clothes effect among customers.

Aristophanes, Plautus, François Rabelais, Laurence Sterne and Jonathan Swift never considered "good" or "bad" taste to be a way to judge their classic works of art.

Tasteless

  1. having no flavour; bland, insipid
  2. in bad taste

Namesakes

  • Bad Taste, the 1987 New Zealand cult film by Peter Jackson

See also





Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Bad taste" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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