Autosuggestion  

From The Art and Popular Culture Encyclopedia

Jump to: navigation, search

Related e

Google
Wikipedia
Wiktionary
Wiki Commons
Wikiquote
Wikisource
YouTube
Shop


Featured:
Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
Enlarge
Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

Autosuggestion is a psychological technique that was developed by apothecary Émile Coué from the late 1800's to the early 1900's. In 1932, German psychiatrist Johannes Schultz developed and published autogenic training, a relaxation technique influenced by the Coué method. Unlike autosuggestion, it has been proven in clinical trials, and along with other relaxation techniques, such as progressive relaxation and meditation, have replaced autosuggestion in therapy. The co-author of Schultz's multi-volume tome on autogenic training, Wolfgang Luthe, was a firm believer that autogenic training was a powerful approach that should only be offered to patients by qualified professionals.

See also




Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Autosuggestion" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

Personal tools