Audio mixing (recorded music)  

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Audio mixing is the process by which a multitude of recorded sounds are combined into one or more channels, most commonly two-channel stereo. In the process, the source signals' level, frequency content, dynamics and panoramic position are commonly being manipulated and effects such as reverb might be added. This practical, aesthetic or otherwise creative treatment is done in order to produce an elevated mix that is more appealing to listeners.

Audio mixing is done in studios as part of an album or single making. The mixing stage often follows the multitrack recording stage and the final mixes are normally submitted to a mastering engineer. The process is generally carried out by a mix engineer, also called mixing engineer, or mixer, though sometimes it is the musical producer, or even the artist who mixes the recorded material.

Prior to the emergence of DAWs (Digital Audio Workstations), the process of mixing used to be carried out on a device known as an audio mixer, sound board, desk, or mixing console. Nowadays, more and more engineers and independent artists are using a personal computer for the process (commonly referred to as mixing in-the-box).

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Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Audio mixing (recorded music)" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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