Arnulf Rainer  

From The Art and Popular Culture Encyclopedia

Jump to: navigation, search

Related e

Google
Wikipedia
Wiktionary
Wiki Commons
Wikiquote
Wikisource
YouTube
Shop


Featured:
Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
Enlarge
Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

Arnulf Rainer, (born 8 December 1929 in Baden, Austria), is an Austrian painter and is internationally renowned for his abstract informal art.

In his early years, Rainer was influenced by the Surrealism. In 1950, he founded the Hundsgruppe (dog group) together with Ernst Fuchs, Arik Brauer and Josef Mikl. After 1954, Rainers style evolved towards Destruction of Forms, with blackenings, overpaintings and maskings of illustrations and photographs, dominating his later work. He was close to the Vienna Actionism, featuring body art and painting under drug influence.

In 1978, he received the Great Austrian National Prize. In the same year, and in 1980, he became the Austrian representative at the Venice Biennale. From 1981 to 1995, Rainer held a professorship at the Academy of Fine Arts in Vienna - the same place where he aborted his own studies after three days, unsatisfied.

His works are shown in the Museum of Modern Art and the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum. As the culmination of the appraisal of his work, in 1993 the Arnulf Rainer Museum opened in New York, United States.



Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Arnulf Rainer" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

Personal tools