Appian Way  

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The Appian Way as it appeared in Piranesi's imagination (1756), from Le Antichità Romane, fanciful figment or scientific illustration?
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The Appian Way as it appeared in Piranesi's imagination (1756), from Le Antichità Romane, fanciful figment or scientific illustration?

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

The Appian Way (Latin and Italian: Via Appia) was one of the earliest and strategically most important Roman roads of the ancient republic. It connected Rome to Brindisi, Apulia, in southeast Italy.

Contents

Monuments along the Via Appia

1st to 4th mile

5th mile

6th mile and beyond

  • Minucia tomb
  • Torre Selce
  • Temple of Hercules
  • Berrettia di Prete (tomb and later church)
  • Mausoleum of Gallienus

Roman bridges along the road

For an overview of the location of Roman bridges, see List of Roman bridges.

There are the remains of several Roman bridges along the road, including the Ponte di Tre Ponti, Ponte di Vigna Capoccio, Viadotta di Valle Ariccia, Ponte Alto and Ponte Antico.

See also




Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Appian Way" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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